Tagged: W22A8

Week 22 – Activity 8: Analytics and pedagogy

Timing: 3 hours

  • Return to the ‘Innovating Pedagogy’ report that you read earlier in the module (Week 5, Activity 14).

    The report identifies ten types of pedagogy that might be used to transform education in the future.

  • Make some initial notes in your learning journal or blog about how three of these pedagogies could be supported by learning analytics. (When considering which three pedagogies to work with, please exclude emotional analytics as this is a form of learning analytics and we are looking for pedagogies that could potentially be supported by learning analytics: not those that embody it already.) You may need to refer back to the definition of learning analytics that you developed last week.
  • In your notes consider the following questions:
    1. What are these pedagogies trying to achieve?
    2. What might learners and teachers need support with?
    3. What sorts of data will be available?

    There is no need to make reference to existing analytic tools or systems. Decide which types of analytic would be valuable even if, as far as you know, they do not exist yet.

  • In your tutor forum, or in OU Live, share your conclusions with your colleagues.
  • Within the group, aim to identify ways in which each of the nine pedagogies could be supported by learning analytics. If the group finds it difficult to identify analytics for one or more of the pedagogies, suggest why this is the case.

Answer:

Pedagogy 1: Adaptive teaching

  1. What is this pedagogies trying to achieve?
    • Using analytics to change teaching to match individual learning speed and understanding.
  2. What might learners and teachers need support with?
    • Identifying the key analytics to measure performance across different tasks. I.e. how thorough a student’s understanding is.
  3. What sorts of data will be available?
    • Test results; time spent on tasks; user contribution to forums; PLE analytics (i.e. outside learning); speed of answering; communication with others to work out solutions; feedback (qualitative) to support a learner’s perspective.

Pedagogy 2: Context-based learning

  1. What is this pedagogies trying to achieve?
    • To use the environment and context students find themselves in, to benefit the learning. Rather than neutralising context for students, bringing in outside experiences and real life scenarios to expose students to more scenarios with the aim of learning from the world around them.
  2. What might learners and teachers need support with?
    • Augmented reality; digital words; VR; crowd learning;
  3. What sorts of data will be available?
    • location data; time spent using different tools; interactions between students in digital worlds; what tools are not used (or aspects within tools); tracking students general activity patterns (i.e. VR > group chat > task).

Pedagogy 3: Embodied learning

  1. What is this pedagogies trying to achieve?
    • How does the body and our habits, actions, shape learning. It concerns how the body shapes and conditions are cognitive learning. It is concerned with the physical process of learning, i.e. what steps are taken to learn a task.
  2. What might learners and teachers need support with?
    • Using physical tracking devices (i.e. movement sensor devices – smartwatches, Fitbit); analysing the movements as they relate to success or challenge; monitoring student’s learning process through gestures, emotions, eye tracking.
  3. What sorts of data will be available?
    • Scenery data (movement); relation between movements/actions and result; time spent on certain movements (i.e. switching applications; eye movements to question and answer); movements that are difficult for students to master; emotion tracking data (sensing frustration through webcam, heart rate).
Advertisements